Must-have meals from Street Food: Asia

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Must-have meals from Street Food: Asia

Our top picks from the hit Netflix show Street Food: Asia

Craving those delicious street foods on Netflix’s hit show Street Food: Asia? Yeah, we are too! We practically can smell the street vendors cooking up these delicious meals. Here are our top picks from the show next time you’re in the mood to cook up something new and exciting.

Most popular street food snacks

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Most popular beverages to go with street food

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Udon

Osaka, Japan

  • In episode 2, we visit Osaka, Japan, and follow an eccentric chef of a beloved izakaya. (Izakayas are casual Japanese bars that serve drinks and snacks). Other well-known Japanese street foods are introduced, such as okonomiyaki, takoyaki, and udon.
  • Udon is thick wheat flour-based noodles and can be prepared in many ways. Still, the most popular preparation in Japan is kake udon, a mild broth made with dashi, mirin, and soy sauce. Kake udon can be topped with fried tofu, soft-boiled eggs, cured fishcakes (kamaboko), and cooked meat or poultry.

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Takoyaki or “Octopus Balls”

Osaka, Japan

  • Don’t let the name scare you! Octopus balls, consisting of (you guessed it) octopus meat inside of deep-fried batter, are a tasty treat you can make in a few minutes.
  • Formerly known as Takoyaki, this foodie favorite can be found in every street corner of Osaka, Japan.
  • To get started, all you need is a tasty batter base and traditional fillings, including chopped boiled octopus, chopped spring onions, red-pickled ginger, and tempura flakes for a bit of a crunch.
  • Then drown your fillings inside the batter and deep fry it until it’s golden brown. Finish it off with a few toppings, such as Takoyaki sauce and bonito flakes.
  • Not a fan of the traditional fillings or toppings? Feel free to give the recipe your own spin!
  • We recommend experimenting with ponzu sauce, a citrus-based soy sauce, or even try creating your own vegetarian version with fillings like shiitake mushrooms, kimchi, or tofu.
  • The best part? Takoyaki only takes about 25 minutes from start to finish. Perfect for a potluck, party, or simply a night in, Takoyaki is always a crowd winner. So next time you’ve got friends or family coming over, make sure to impress them with this fun and easy street food favorite.

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Chilli Crab

Singapore

  • Episode 8 of Street Food: Asia takes us to Singapore and explores the world of hawker food centers. The episode focuses on a putu piring stand (steamed rice flour with a melted palm sugar center). Still, other Singapore favorites are explored, like chicken rice, wonton noodles, and the famous chili crab.
  • Chilli crab has been a Singapore staple dish since the 1960s and is commonly made with mud crabs. The dish is prepared by stir-frying crab and then cooking it in a thick sweet, savory chilli tomato sauce that is milder in flavor than the name suggests. The dish is so popular the flavor profile is used on various Asian chips and snacks.

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Douhua or “Tofu Pudding”

Chiayi, Taiwan

  • If you’re not drooling yet, then maybe this next street food will do the trick.
  • Douhua, or tofu pudding, can be made to be sweet or savory depending on the ingredients you use.
  • It’s a velvety soft, delicate, uncurdled tofu that is a big hit in Taiwan and other neighboring countries. This traditional tofu pudding can be served hot with sugar or salt, depending on your mood.
  • The salty version is great for a light dinner served with toppings like celery, shrimp, or seaweed. On the flip side, if you’re in the mood for something a bit on the sweet side, then simply swap out a few ingredients and serve hot with a little sugar. It’s perfect for a chilly morning at home, or honestly, a great hangover cure.
  • Hey, we’ve all been there, right? No shame. The secret to its amazing flavor? It’s all in the creativity. Chefs and home cooks from all over add their own personal spin to the traditional recipe and why it’s one of our favorite picks from Street Food: Asia.

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Bindae-tteok or “Mung bean pancakes”

Seoul, South Korea

  • Last but not least on our Street Food: Asia tour, we’ve arrived at the famous Bindae-tteok or “Mung bean pancakes”. Just as the name suggests, these South Korean street foods are pancake-shaped and the perfect handheld snack.
  • Want more than just a snack? Stack a few pancakes and you’ve got yourself a full-sized meal.
  • Mung bean pancakes are savory, crispy, and absolutely necessary if you’re interested in learning South Korean basics.
  • Oh, did we mention it’s super tasty? It consists of all our favorite ingredients: rice, kimchi, pork, vegetables, eggs, and, of course, the not-so-secret ingredient, grounded mung beans.
  • Plus, the best part is that you can prepare these pancakes ahead of time. Simply make them in large batches, freeze them, and come back to them at a later date. When you're ready to enjoy, all you need to do is defrost a few and pan-fry them in a little bit of oil.
  • Pair with a little Makgeolli, a traditional Korean rice liquor and you’ve got a fun night ahead of you. Don’t have Korean rice liquor hanging around? You can substitute with Sake, but make sure it’s Nigori (unfiltered) to get the closest favor.

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